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Mice/Hurt mouse?

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Cindee wrote at 2015-07-03 06:43:33
Thanks Tam.  The closest wildlife rehab is 2 hours away so that's not really an option.  But I do think I have good news...it's now been 62 hours and our little mouse is still with us.  After I wrote to you, I moved him into my office where the temperature stays around 72 degrees.  Safe and warm without using a hot water bottle.  Yesterday morning I thought he was not going to make it.  He didn't want to eat or drink, he just slept and acted bothered when I tried to feed him but he did eat a little.  So I decided to just let him rest.  I checked on him every hour but didn't wake him or even let him know I was there.  I last fed him at around 1:00 am and put about a tablespoon of granola cereal and a little cosmetic like jar cap of water with him, went to bed and hoped for the best.  Oh I also got some advise that if my cat actually bit him, he might need antibiotics.  Luckily I just happened to have some Clavamox but it was murder trying to find the right dosage.  I found two sites that recommended 0.0625 mg.  So that's what I gave him.  I just mixed it with a little water and a dash of sugar and he took it without a problem.



Well I got up this morning and to my absolute delight, he had eaten almost all of the granola, and he was sitting up and cleaning himself.  That HAS to be a good sign.  So I went out today and bought some proper mouse food and bedding.  So he's all fixed up for hopefully a speedy recovery.  In the mean time I called the wildlife center to see if they had any more advice or tips to help me but they kind of put a damper on my good day.  First they weren't happy with the mouse food that I bought. They said that I should go out and collect grass seed from the local area instead.  Then they said that the amount of Clavamox I was giving him was way too much.  I think they misunderstood and  thought that I gave him .625 mg.  I asked, but they wouldn't tell me what dosage they give the mice they rehab.  So I searched and searched but all I could find was the .0625 or .05 for a baby squirrel.  To be on the safe side, tonight I gave him the .05.  I made my own solution of 2 -62.5 mg tablets mixed with 2 ml of filtered water and a dash of sugar  to hide the taste.  I just put the syringe at the corner of his mouth and in it went.  I'll continue this for the next week and hopefully he will be recovered enough for me to put him back into the wild.  I won't do that though until I feel 100% certain that he's able to fend for himself again.



I also did a taste test this afternoon with the food that I bought. I live in a very rural town, 2 hours from the "real" world, so there's not much choice but, I still think what I got for him sounded like it had the right ingredients.  I put a little container of the granola cereal and one of the mouse food and it was no contest...he dove into the mouse food.  He ate for about 10 minutes, then went back to sleep.  He's moving around more now and more active.  Still not like a normal mouse, but he's clearly much better than he was when I first started taking care of him.  It's almost like he's got sore muscles.  No doubt that my cat beat him up.  The only thing I'm a bit concerned with is that if I wake him to give him fluids  (which I've stopped now since he's eating on his own) as he tries to grab the eye dropper, he wobbles from side to side.  It only lasts a few seconds but that seems a bit strange.  He doesn't wobble when he walks though.  It's almost like he's not fully awake but realizes that someone is trying to give him food so he grabs the dropper.  If I take it away, he just kind of snuggles back into his bedding.  He doesn't open his eyes when he does this either almost like he's still asleep.  Although this morning his eyes were wide open as he was cleaning himself so I know there's nothing going on with his eyes. I'm keeping him on a shelf that allows me to kind of pull a shaded down over it so he's in a fairly dark area all day like he would be out in the wild.  Does the wobbling sound like anything I should be concerned about or do you think he may just not be fully awake?



Thanks again for any advice you can offer.  I truly appreciate it.



Cindee


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Tamarah

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I can answer questions regarding mice as pets, mouse behavior, color and coat genetics, breeding techniques, and general health questions. I can help with caging and setup, nutrition, social issues, and what to do in most mouse emergencies (such as unplanned litters, injuries, fighting, etc.). I can also assist with questions pertaining to orphaned mouse pups, weaning litters, and questions of mating and birthing. I cannot answer questions about exotic or wild varieties of mice such as spiny or pygmy mice. *****FOR EMERGENCIES, anything requiring immediate medical intervention, PLEASE take your mouse to a professional veterinarian or wildlife rehabilitator who works with mice as soon as possible! IMPORTANT RESOURCES: Raising Orphaned Mice: http://www.rmca.org/Articles/orphans.htm Orphaned Mice Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/CreekValleyCritters/videos?query=raising Natasha's Your First Mouse: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNK4uqNZTbA&feature=share General Mouse Help: http://www.fancymice.info/ Mouse Info and Exotic Breeds: http://www.hiiret.fi/eng/species/

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I have enjoyed the companionship of mice nonstop since 2004, and spent a year caring for them in a lab where I learned a great deal about their breeding, social needs, and health. I spent a few years breeding them, specifically working with albinos, marked mice, angora mice, and satins. My education never stopped - I am learning something new every day from current and well-established research thanks to the wonderful folks at the Jackson Laboratory, as well as from my wonderful mousey friends online. I also love learning from my terrific questioners here on AllExperts - you folks keep my passion for these amazing animals alive and well!

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East Coast Mouse Association - expired, American Fancy Rat and Mouse Association - expired

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Partial University for a B.S. in Microbiology, Partial University for a 2-year degree in Veterinary Technology (RVT cert), C.E. classes in pathogens, aseptic technique, genetics, and applications

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