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Military History/Medical Unit assigned to the 10th Armored Division

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QUESTION: My apology if there is an empty message from me. Something happened on my computer. Anyway- I am looking for information about the medical units with the 10th Armored. I know my father was with the 10th- and he was a medic. I am assuming it was the 80th Medical Battalion. Some of my information indicates he was possible in Co. D which would have been a clearing company. I would like to know more about the medics in the clearing companies, how the work my dad did was planned, etc. He died 50 years ago and I never had the chance to talk to him about these things. I am sure of the connection with the 10th Armored from several sources and comparing my grandmother's diary with the history of the Div. Thanks for any help you can give.
Barry Lehman
(My father's name was Harold K. Lehman)

ANSWER: Dear Sir,
       Thank you for your question.  In it you typed "I know my father was with the 10th".  OK, I will accept your statement.
       In your question you typed "he was a medic".  OK. I will accept your statement.
       In your question you typed "I am assuming it was the 80th Medical Battalion."  Commanded by Lt. Colonel Michael D. Buscemi OR Lt. Colonel Edwin S. Wallace, the 80th Armored Medical Battalion was assigned to the 10th Armored Division during WW 2.
       In your question you typed "information indicates he was possible in Co. D which would have been a clearing company."  Before me I have a Table of Organization for the 80th Armored Medical Battalion.  There is a HQ Company & three Armored Medical Companies, A, B, & C.  Sorry, I am unable to locate a "Co. D".  
       Within any of the three Armored Medical Companies there are the following:

Company HQ
    Command Section
    Administrative, Supply & Mess Section
    Maintenance Section
Litter Platoon
Ambulance Platoon
Treatment Platoon
    Platoon HQ
    Operating Section
    Casualty Treatment Section

May I ask, what is your source (FACT based document) that your father was assigned to a "Co. D" which was a "clearing company"?
       In your question you typed "know more about the medics in the clearing companies".  As to "clearing companies" I have no idea.  As to "medics" assigned to the 10th Armored Division in the E.T.O., I suggest you read:

Impact
by Lester M. Nichols
Nashville   TN        The Battery Press        2000

    ISBN:  0-89839-303-5

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

United States Army In World War II
The Technical Services
 The Medical Department:
Medical Services In The European Theater of Operations
by Graham A. Cosmas & Albert E. Cowdrey
Washington   DC        Center of Military History, US Army        1992

       Good Luck with your quest.

  Respectfully,
   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thanks for your response. I have pictures of my father with the 10th's arm patch, and I know he was a medic. In my research into medics in WW 2 (in the green books) they listed the four companies that were assigned in each medical battalion. Co. D was a clearing company, as I understand it, several miles behind the front, unlike A, B, & C (Collecting Companies) which were at the front.

On my dad's gravestone from the VA in 1964 he was listed as 9th medical battalion, company D. Hence the assumption of Co. D, even though I can't connect a 9th med. bat. with the 10th. Since your response, I have dug up some more information from a postcard he sent home at the end of the war from Garmisch-Partenkirchen that indicates the 80th medical battalion, Co. C.

My theory about the "9th med and Co. D" is that he was first drafted in early 1941 and trained at Camp Blanding, FL, then was discharged to the reserves until the 10th was formed, first at Fort Benning and then Camp Gordon. I have my grandmother's diaries that indicate where he was - except for 1941. The Camp Blanding is from a picture of his medical battalion there.

Since his records were destroyed in the fire in St. Louis in the 70s, I am working on whatever else I can find. Any more leads would be helpful.

Thanks for your help so far.

Barry

Answer
Dear Sir,
       I acknowledge your follow-up.  In it you typed "I have pictures of my father with the 10th's arm patch".  I am not sure what an "arm patch" is, but I will accept what you have typed.
       In your follow-up you typed "On my dad's gravestone from the VA in 1964 he was listed as 9th medical battalion, company D."  The stone cutter utilized the FACTS typed in Box #6 on page two of the Veteran's Discharge Documents.  That unit, "9th medical battalion, company D" 9th Infantry Division, was the unit the Veteran was assigned to after May 8, 1945, for the purpose of returning to the U.S.A. to be discharged.  The stone cutter could only cut the FACTS from page two of the Discharge Documents, the Discharge Documents provided by the family to the Funeral Home, then to the stone cutter.  So the Veteran WAS assigned to the "9th medical battalion, company D" JUST NOT PRIOR to May 8, 1945, when the Veteran made his significant contribution to the Allied Victory!  
       In your follow-up you typed "Hence the assumption of Co. D, even though I can't connect a 9th med. bat. with the 10th."  Correct, you cannot connect "9th med. bat. with the 10th" because the 9th Medical Battalion was assigned [assigned] to the 9th Infantry Division, the 80th Armored Medical Battalion was assigned [assigned] to the 10th Armored Division.  When attempting to conduct ACCURATE historic research, an "assumption" is fraught with peril.
       In your follow-up you typed "My theory about the.......his medical battalion there."  Since a "theory" is sufficient for the summation of your historic research about the Veteran, it is easy for me to provide you with another "theory".  The Veteran was assigned {assigned} to Company C, 80th Armored Medical Battalion, 10th Armored Division prior to May 8, 1945.  After May 8, 1945 the Veteran was assigned [assigned] to Company D, 9th Medical Battalion, 9th Infantry Division, to return to the U.S.A.  How is my "theory"?
       

   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections  

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Richard V. Horrell

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Can answer: World War Two. Specifically, the troop transport ships that took US Military Personnel overseas & returned them to the US, 1941-47. Also, unit history of US Army QM, Signal, MP, Ordnance, Medical, Transportation & Engineer units that served during WW 2. The more obscure units are my specialty. If you have the APO that a Veteran sent letters from or received letters at, I can look up the history of that APO.

Experience

A lifelong study of WW 2, including participation as a WW 2 Re-enactor, 1980-2002. Also, interviewing over 400 WW 2 Veterans about their role in WW 2.

Organizations
AASLH, Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society

Publications
Over 800 Profiles that I have written for client's about their loved one's role in WW 2.

Education/Credentials
BA, History & Political Science (19th & 20th Century European History) Webster University, Webster Groves, MO.

Awards and Honors
Assisting the National Archives on numerous occasions during the 50th Anniversary Commemoration of WW 2, 1991-95.

Past/Present Clients
Respectfully, I do not disclose the names of the clients I deal with. I have a confidentially agreement with them.

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