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Military History/103rd AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion

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QUESTION: My father served in the 103rd AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion in World War II. I know he fought in the Battle of the Bulge, was also at Remagen Bridge. Can't find very much about his unit. I believe his unit was attached to First Army and he ended up in Czechoslovakia. His surviving uniform shirt also has a tank destroyer patch on it. Were AAA units also in a tank destroyer role?

ANSWER: Dear Sir,
       Thank you for your question.  In it you typed "My father served in the 103rd AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion in World War II."  I am familiar with the 103rd AAA Auto-Weapons Battalion, Kentucky National Guard.  The 103rd AAA Auto-Weapons Battalion participated in the following Campaigns:

Sicily          July 9-August 17, 1943
Normandy          June 6-July 24, 1944
Northern France    July 25-September 14, 1944
Rhineland          September 15, 1944-March 21, 1945
Ardennes-Alsace    December 16, 1944-January 15, 1945
Central Europe     March 22-May 8, 1945

       In your question you typed "I know he fought in the Battle of the Bulge".  Yes, the 103rd AAA Auto-Weapons Battalion, Kentucky National Guard did participate in the Ardennes-Alsace Campaign.
       In your question you typed "was also at Remagen Bridge."  With all due respect, the bridge you refer to was not the "Remagen Bridge" but the Ludendorff Rail Road Bridge, located at Remagen, Germany.  While a few units did cross the Ludendorff Rail Road Bridge while controlled by First Army Units (March 7-17, 1945) most units crossed the various nearby tactical bridges built by First Army Engineer Units.
       In your question you typed "Can't find very much about his unit."  Sorry to read that, since I am having no problem providing you with these FACTS so far, & more to come.  May I suggest you contact the Adjutant Generals Office, Frankfort, Kentucky, for FACTS about the 103rd AAA Auto-Weapons Battalion, Kentucky National Guard.
       In your question you typed "I believe his unit was attached to First Army".  With all due respect, the 103rd AAA Auto-Weapons Battalion, Kentucky National Guard was assigned [assigned] to First Army.  The 103rd was attached [attached] to the 1st Infantry Division, June 12, 1944-February 7, 1945 & February 24-May 8, 1945.  February 8-23, 1945, command & control of the 103rd reverted back to First Army.
       In your question you typed "he ended up in Czechoslovakia."  HQ, 1st Infantry Division was located at Cheb, Sudeten Region of Czechoslovakia, May 6-8, 1945.
       In your question you typed "His surviving uniform shirt also has a tank destroyed patch on it."  Sewn to the upper left sleeve, or the upper right sleeve?
       In your question you typed "Were AAA units also in a tank destroyer role?"  AAA Gun Battalions, potentially.  AAA Auto-Weapons Battalions, no.
       Would you be so kind as to provide me with ALL THAT IS TYPED in Box #6, Box #32 & Box #36 on page two of your father's Discharge Documents (WD AGO Form 53-55)?
       Good Luck with your quest.

  Respectfully,
   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: The Tank Destroyer patch on my father's uniform shirt is on the left sleeve. I will get his papers from my mother so I can answer your questions. I know that somewhere there's a tank destroyer battalion listed in his things. I do know he received training in Texas. Will try to gather as much information as I can from what my mother still has.

Answer
Dear Sir,
       Thank you for your follow-up.  In it you typed "The Tank Destroyer patch on my father's uniform shirt is on the left sleeve."  Shoulder patches sewn to the upper left sleeve indicate the unit the soldier is assigned [assigned] to.  Sewn to the upper right sleeve indicates the unit the soldier was assigned [assigned] to.  In my OPINION, the Tank Destroyer patch indicates the unit your father was assigned [assigned] to AFTER May 8, 1945, for the purpose of his return to the United States to be discharged from the US Army.
       Good Luck with your quest.

  Respectfully,
   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections

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Richard V. Horrell

Expertise

Can answer: World War Two. Specifically, the troop transport ships that took US Military Personnel overseas & returned them to the US, 1941-47. Also, unit history of US Army QM, Signal, MP, Ordnance, Medical, Transportation & Engineer units that served during WW 2. The more obscure units are my specialty. If you have the APO that a Veteran sent letters from or received letters at, I can look up the history of that APO.

Experience

A lifelong study of WW 2, including participation as a WW 2 Re-enactor, 1980-2002. Also, interviewing over 400 WW 2 Veterans about their role in WW 2.

Organizations
AASLH, Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society

Publications
Over 800 Profiles that I have written for client's about their loved one's role in WW 2.

Education/Credentials
BA, History & Political Science (19th & 20th Century European History) Webster University, Webster Groves, MO.

Awards and Honors
Assisting the National Archives on numerous occasions during the 50th Anniversary Commemoration of WW 2, 1991-95.

Past/Present Clients
Respectfully, I do not disclose the names of the clients I deal with. I have a confidentially agreement with them.

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