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Military History/633rd Ordnance Ammunition Company

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Question
QUESTION: Hi  My original question was dated 2015-12-06 and about the 633rd ord company. Sorry I can't figure out how to attach this to the original question.  I'm replying to your question about info on a V-mail letter.   Letter info:  ASN33784663,  Pvt James F Gavin, June 23, 1944,  633 ord (am) co APO 350 c/o postmaster New York NY.  I don't know that the letter was sent from England, but he mentions not being able to go see his mother's sister.  His mother was born in Yorkshire.  Looking at the date, if he was in England on June 23rd then he didn't go to France on D-day.  I seem to remember him telling me that he was on the ship for D-day and then his group was taken off and that he didn't know why.  He showed me a scar from a through and through bullet wound that he said he got "on the beach".  Thank you very much for your efforts.  Regards,  Edie

ANSWER: Dear Ms.,
       Thank you for your follow-up.  In it you typed "My original question was dated 2015-12-06 and about the 633rd ord company."  Yes, that is correct, with a follow-up on January 3, 2016, also about the 633rd Ordnance Ammunition Company.
       In your follow-up you typed "June 23, 1944, 633 ord (am) co APO 350".  APO 350 was based in England, April 15-July 31, 1944.
       In your follow-up you typed "I don't know that the letter was sent from England".  According to the location dates of APO 350, the V-Mail was sent from England.
       In your follow-up you typed "Looking at the date, if he was in England on June 23rd then he didn't go to France on D-day."  That is correct.  Unless, of course, he had already been to France, WIA & already back in "England" recovering.  What is typed in Box #34 on page two of your father's Discharge Documents (WD AGO Form 53-55)?
       In your follow-up you typed "He showed me a scar from a through and through bullet would that he said he got "on the beach"."  With all due respect, "on the beach" does not indicate which day he was "on the beach" when what you typed about happened.
       Good Luck with your quest.

  Respectfully,
   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Answering your question about box 34 it says "none".  What he told me was that he had the medic fix the wound and then just went on.  He didn't consider it serious. It's unlikely he was sent to England for this.  He also showed me a lot of pitting marks on his calves.  He said there was an explosion at the ammo dump where he was working.  Again just treatment by the medic.  I'm thinking there was a lot of this casual fixing up of people.   Looking at the facts you have given, can I conclude the letter was sent from England on the 23rd of June and then he could have been in France any time after that?  Where soldiers ever returned to England after being in France without being officially WIA?  You have been very helpful and I appreciate your work.  One last thing I wanted to ask.  My father told me something I have never read in any history.  He said he saw large "tubes" on the southern coast of England and at first thought they were artillery.  He said he was told there was a plan to shoot some petrol product out of these tubes on to the ocean and set it on fire.  This would only be done if the Germans tried to invade.  Have you ever heard of this?

Answer
Dear Ms.,
       Thank you for your follow-up.  In it you typed "Answering your question about box 34 it says "none"."  So according to the records of the US Army, your father was never WIA.
       In your follow-up you typed "I'm thinking there was a lot of this casual fixing up of people."  With the "fixing up" being "casual" none of the men would be receiving credit for their being WIA, therefore increasing their ASR (Adjusted Service Rating) Score.  The ASR Score helped to determine how soon the Veteran would return home after hostilities ceased.  I'll bet a lot of Veterans ended up none-too-happy as per being "casual" about being WIA.
       In your follow-up you typed "Looking at the facts you have.......in France any time after that?"  You are welcome to conclude whatever you wish.
       In your follow-up you typed "Where [sic] soldiers ever returned to England after being in France without being officially WIA?"  In the context of what you have typed, in my opinion, no.
       In your follow-up you typed "My father told me something I.......Have you ever heard of this?"  Yes, I have.
       Good Luck with your quest.


  Respectfully,
   Richard V. Horrell
    WW 2 Connections

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Richard V. Horrell

Expertise

Can answer: World War Two. Specifically, the troop transport ships that took US Military Personnel overseas & returned them to the US, 1941-47. Also, unit history of US Army QM, Signal, MP, Ordnance, Medical, Transportation & Engineer units that served during WW 2. The more obscure units are my specialty. If you have the APO that a Veteran sent letters from or received letters at, I can look up the history of that APO.

Experience

A lifelong study of WW 2, including participation as a WW 2 Re-enactor, 1980-2002. Also, interviewing over 400 WW 2 Veterans about their role in WW 2.

Organizations
AASLH, Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society

Publications
Over 800 Profiles that I have written for client's about their loved one's role in WW 2.

Education/Credentials
BA, History & Political Science (19th & 20th Century European History) Webster University, Webster Groves, MO.

Awards and Honors
Assisting the National Archives on numerous occasions during the 50th Anniversary Commemoration of WW 2, 1991-95.

Past/Present Clients
Respectfully, I do not disclose the names of the clients I deal with. I have a confidentially agreement with them.

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