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Nanotechnology/Electrons and photons

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Question
At room temperature, there is a singular bond holding the oxygen atoms together with two electrons, (for example HO-OH).  A 'correct' nm (nano-meter) photon hitting an oxygen's electron will give the electron enough energy to 'disappear' from the bond.  This leaves one electron in the bond.  

Is there enough energy in the 'one' electron to maintain the bond?

Thank you!

Answer
Hi Bob,  I don't think you scales are right.  There are certainly no nm photons or we would have seen them already.  Electrons swap and change positions all the time and these changes result in emission of X-rays or by changing internal charge density.  I am not familiar enough with the water molecule H2O to answer the second part of your question.

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Jan

Expertise

General questions on NanoTechnology and Materials Science. Specifically in Electron Microscopy

Experience

Worked with Electron Microscopes for 25 years

Organizations
Microscopy Society of America, SAE, TMS.

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PhD Materials Science

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