National Security Agency/Nuclear

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Question
Why does the U.S. have such a double standard regarding nukes.

They allow Pakistan and North Korea to have nukes but are trying to regulate Iran.

Where's the logic on this ? ?

If you were Iranian, that would be so incredibly abusive.

Please help me to understand.

Answer
I apologize for the tardiness of this response. I was without power as a result of Hurricane Sandy for two weeks. I am just beginning to get back to civilization.

I can understand your frustration. But what seems like a double standard is, in fact, the reality of various nation states interacting with the rest of the world from within their own national interests. Pakistan and Iran do not recognize the existence of the State of Israel. The United States does. The United States is by no means thrilled that Pakistan and North Korea have nuclear bombs, but what could the United States reasonably do about it?

So if the United States now wants to prevent yet another nation state from developing nuclear weapons, it is not really inconsistency. In a perfect world, no further nations acquire them and those that do have them move toward disarmament and further stability.

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Keith Massey

Expertise

I can answer any questions on the topic within an unclassified framework. Classified information I know about the agency (as a former employee) I can not divulge.

Experience

I worked at the National Security Agency for four years, from 2002-2006, in the capacity of an Arabic linguist.

Organizations
None pertinent

Publications
2008 Intermediate Arabic for Dummies. ISBN 9780470373378. Wiley Publishing. 2008 "A Latin Etymology for Romanian DA = Yes" in Ianua. Revista Philologica Romanica. 2008 "Further Evidence for an "Italic" Substratum in Romanian," in Philologie im Netz 43/2008, pp. 11-16. 2007 "Vergilian Allusions In Newman’s “Kindly Light," in Newman Studies Journal, Vol. 4, Issue 2, Fall 2007. 2006 "A Second Look at Latin Secundus = 'Favorable'" in Pomoerium Online Journal, Vol. 5/2004-2006. 2002 "Letters and Mysterious Letters," contributor of article for Encyclopedia of the Qur'an (E.J. Brill Publishers). 1996 "Mystery Letters of the Quran," in Arabica (E.J. Brill Publishers) by Keith Massey. 1995 "Semitic Quadriliteral Animal Terms: An Explanation," in Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages (University of Stellenbosch, South Africa) by Keith Massey and Kevin Massey-Gillespie. 1993 "Dialogue of Creeds" in ISLAMOCHRISTIANA (Pontifical Institute of Arabic and Islamic Studies) by Keith Massey and Kevin Massey-Gillespie.

Education/Credentials
Education PhD 1998 University of Wisconsin-Madison Hebrew and Semitic Studies, Arabic Minor MA 1992 University of Wisconsin-Madison Hebrew and Semitic Studies MA 1990 Luther Seminary, St. Paul, MN Old Testament BA 1987 University of Wisconsin-Madison Classics (Latin and Greek)

Awards and Honors
Previous Position Arabic Linguist (June 2002-July 2006) National Security Agency, Fort Meade, MD Achieved Professional Certification as Level 3 Voice Linguist and Level 3 Graphic Linguist, passing two of the four examinations with honors. Served at an overseas field site. Through the National Security Agency, has studied Iraqi Dialect and Egyptian Dialect and used each in an operational context.

Past/Present Clients
None pertinent

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