You are here:

Nutrition & Dieting/Oxalates and Green smoothies

Advertisement


Question
Hello: I am a fairly healthy 66 year old male,and I read an article that suggested consuming more leafy green vegetables might slow one's mental decline ( http://www.zmescience.com/medicine/mind-and-brain/leafy-green-brain-06072015/?ut ).
My diet is deficient in leafy greens,and I was wondering if I could increase my intake with green smoothies.Looking for green smoothie recipes led me to a website that suggested this was a bad idea,as leafy greens are high in oxalates ( http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/how-green-smoothies-can-devastate-your-he ). Is there any truth to this? I have never had kidney stones,nor has anyone else in my family.Thanks!

Answer
Hello Michael,

It sure can be confusing, reading all these contradictory articles: One day a food is good for you and the next day it's not!

That's why the best practice is eating a variety of foods in a balanced diet. Too many leafy greens may cause a variety of issues, given the right circumstances; but as you say, you do not have kidney stones, so oxalate should not be an issue.

Leafy greens are also good sources of vitamin A, folic acid, and vitamin C, not to mention fiber and phytochemicals.
If you can take them in a smoothie once in a while, get them that way. Others find they like raw forms of these vegetables, like using spinach leaves on a sandwich instead of lettuce, or adding baby greens to a tossed salad.

I admire your attempt to eat healthy, but researching which foods are good/bad will end up confusing even the most intelligent scientist.... just keep your aim on incorporating a variety of foods each day and avoiding too much of the foods everyone agrees aren't 'good for you' like sugar, salt, and saturated fats!

Laurie

Nutrition & Dieting

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Laurie Beebe, MS, RD, LD

Expertise

As a registered dietitian (RD)I am fully qualified to accurately answer questions regarding weight loss, including those from people with health conditions requiring dietary restrictions (diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc) who want to lose weight, or who have been advised to do so by their physician.

Experience

I have been a registered dietitian for over 30 years and have a certificate in Adult Weight Management through the commission on dietetic registration at Level 1 and Level 2. I am also trained in coaching through Coach U and currently work as a diet coach to help people lose weight the healthy way, through gradual habit changes.

Organizations
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, Nutrition Entreprenuers, St.Louis International Coach Federation, Toastmasters

Publications
Livestrong.com, Glamour.com, Ezinearticles.com, Ehow.com, Today's Dietitian

Education/Credentials
Bachelor of Health Science from the University of Florida, 1983; Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition from Case Western Reserve University 1985; Certificate in Adult Weight Management 2006; CoachU core essentials grad 2007; Level 2 certificate in Adult Weight Management 2010.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.