Oral Surgery/oligodontia

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Question
Hi. The research needed is a dental condition called oligodontia, which is a mouth and jaw condition that prevents the growing of permanent teeth (more than 6 teeth fail to form) and hypodontia (which is the congenital missing of up to 6 teeth). The research I am looking for is to confirm how frequent this is..and any other stats that may be available. I searched university databases and not much luck on stats. I recall reading that hypodontia in some form or another affects up to 20% of the population. Is this true?? Any and all stats are useful.   I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you!

Answer
Karen - I did a little research, like I'm sure you have done and found variable percentages in different studies.  I have seen the process quite a few times, but in my practice it was only less than 5 percent.

I wish I could give you an exact figure or even an approximate one, but I cannot not.  I found in a study from Louisiana that they state about 7%.  I wish I could be more exacting.  Sorry.

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Joel S. Teig, DMD, Diplomate ABOMS, retired

Expertise

I am a board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon available to answer questions related to tooth extractions, implant insertion, facial recontruction, facial and oral tumor removal, TMJ dysfunction and various successful treatments, including surgery if all else fails, and occlusal discrepancy requiring orthognathic or jaw surgery.

Experience

Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon practicing for over 20 years. Assistant Clincal Professor at State University School of Dentistry.

Organizations
American Dental Association, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

Education/Credentials
BA- University of Connecticut DMD-University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Residency - Roosevelt Hospital, NYC

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