Oral Surgery/Tongue

Advertisement


Question
Morning
Morning  
Afternoon after lunch
Afternoon after lunch  
QUESTION: Hi dr Joel,
I visited my general dentist today and he said that it could be a superficial allergy to metal from where I have some metal fillings but not sure. Also I have a tooth missing on lower left which is a big molar and getting a bridge might straighten out the chewing issue which could be throwing my alignment off. If not, may just be a subconscious thrusting of the tongue. Whatever the case he said he wasn't concerned and didn't think I even needed a consult with oral surgeon. I guess I have to trust what he says. Does
Any of this make sense to you? It's weird because I have no pain and it looks much better when I wake up and worsens throughout the day. That tells me that it has something to do with eating and chewing that is causing the irritation because maybe I'm missing that lower molar on lower left and I'm compensating for that. The clicking tmj is also on that left side. He suggested trying to remove one silver filling on right and replace it with white one and see what happens. Then get a bridge for lower left. The allergy doesn't make much sense to me especially if it improves in morning. Here is a pic to show you morning versus night. Thanks for listening.

ANSWER: Steve -  I agree with you.  I have heard so many homeopathic dentists who tell their patients to remove their silver fillings.  Silver fillings are benign and the mercury used to make it fuses and does not have any affect on the surrounding tissues.  

Most likely the lesion is due to some recurring habit that occurs with swallowing or from irregular jaw actions.  Whichever, a good dentist can assist you is curing the problem by either reorienting your jaw actions or by assisting you in bad jaw habits.  

I wish I could find you a doctor that I know can help you, but I just don't in your area.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: I believe you are right on dr Joel. It's gotta be from chewing or irregular jaw actions. That's why it looks different after eating etc.

ANSWER: I am glad that you understand the cause.  Now, you need assistance to stop these problems.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Tooth
Tooth  

Toothh
Toothh  
QUESTION: Exactly. I'm gonna start with the lower left bridge because I'm missing a big molar on lower left and that might be causing the imbalance in chewing with jaw which potentially is causing the tongue not to rest properly and I might be inadvertently rubbing it or chewing it when eating. Here is a pic of that missing tooth. Does that make sense to you?

Answer
The loss of the tooth has affected the balance of your bite.  When that occurs, the jaw is subconciously directly to find a balance of the bite.  When that does not fully exist, it's like searching in a dark room for something that was lost.  You can search and occasionally you'll find what was lost, but that is today and the looking is repeatedly hundreds of time daily.

So you need a qualified dentist to help you balance your occlusion by leveling your bite.

Oral Surgery

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Joel S. Teig, DMD, Diplomate ABOMS, retired

Expertise

I am a board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon available to answer questions related to tooth extractions, implant insertion, facial recontruction, facial and oral tumor removal, TMJ dysfunction and various successful treatments, including surgery if all else fails, and occlusal discrepancy requiring orthognathic or jaw surgery.

Experience

Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon practicing for over 20 years. Assistant Clincal Professor at State University School of Dentistry.

Organizations
American Dental Association, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

Education/Credentials
BA- University of Connecticut DMD-University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Residency - Roosevelt Hospital, NYC

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.