PC hardware--CPU & Motherboard & RAM/Transfer of data

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Question
I have a Toshiba (vista) that is damaged.  I spilled water on it and I get nothing but a black screen. The computer turns on when push the power button. I purchased a Toshiba computer (8.1 windows) so my question is how do I remove all the data from the old computer and transfer it to the new computer?  I heard that I can remove the hard copy from the old computer and transfer to the new computer but I was hoping that there would be an easier way.

Thank You,
Lynnsie

Answer
If the machine isn't booting, especially after a water event, pulling the hard-drive is the easiest/fastest method to attempt to recover the data. This assumes the hard-drive wasn't damaged in the event. If you're unfamiliar with such a procedure, I'd suggest having someone with more experience/expertise help you, but in general it isn't so complicated as to be impossible - locate where the hard-drive is installed, remove it, and then connect it to the new machine via a USB<->hard-drive adapter (you will have to determine if the drive is SATA or PATA, which is an easy visual identification once the drive is loose - PATA will be two rows of 22 pins each, while SATA is a small black connector; I'll include pictures at the end). Such an adapter is fairly inexpensive and can be purchased online from a store like Amazon.

Once the disk is hooked up, you'll just have to hunt through it (it won't have your new machine booting up into Windows Vista, it'll just be accessed like flash drive or other auxiliary disk) to locate whatever you want - transferring things like installed programs is generally impossible (the programs should be re-installed on the new machine), but recovering media like pictures, word documents, etc is generally no problem.

Pictures for SATA or PATA:
http://wiki.freegeek.org/images/2/21/Pata-vs-sata.jpg

And a USB connector device:
http://www.amazon.com/Vantec-CB-ISATAU2-Supports-2-5-Inch-5-25-Inch/dp/B000J01I1 (this one actually supports both formats, so you just have to figure out where you're going to plug the drive in, as opposed to buying a specific connector).

Again, if you're uncertain about performing this procedure, I would strongly suggest seeking outside help that's able to physically assess the machine (which is, unfortunately, something I cannot do via the Internet).

If you need further information or clarification, feel free to post a follow-up.

-bob

PC hardware--CPU & Motherboard & RAM

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Bobbert

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I have nearly two decades of experience in IT, computer repair, and related fields and will attempt to provide the most solid, brand-agnostic advice when it comes time to purchase a new computer, or upgrade an existing machine. I can answer anything from the seemingly basic to the downright complicated - and will do my best to provide this information in a clear and concise manner.

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I have been an enthusiast of PC's for many years, and can answer questions about the purchase/use of a new computer or the purchase, installation, and use of upgrades for existing computers. There probably isn't a whole lot related to the home computer that I haven't seen over the years.

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15+ years of experience

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