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Paintball/how does a paintball gun work?

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Question
hi im a student at cms and i would like to phone you like an interview for a project of mine, here are the quistions. how was paintball invented? what are the main peices of the paintball gu that make it work? and what is the gear needed foe a paintball game. if you dont know how paintball was invented thats okay i just need your input.so if you want to help me can you give me your phone number

Answer
hi caelan,

i would rather not do a interview over the phone but i will try my best to answer your questions through the all experts website.

from what i remember researching paintballs where first used to mark trees and cattle from a distance and well guys will be guys and they started shooting each other and the sport was born.

the operation of paintball markers is different with the different types of marker and even with each marker brand.

there are 3 types of paintball marker: electro-pneumatic, Blow back, and pump

the electro-pneumatic are relativity new compared to the blow back type markers and operate with higher possible fire rates and with greater efficiency. basically they store the pressurized air in a chamber and use a smaller jet of air to move the bolt forward thus creating a seal with the paintball in the barrel and dumping the pressurized air to shoot the paintball out of the barrel. to re set another small jet of air is used to push the bolt back to allow another paintball to drop down from the loader into the path of the bolt. other devices are used to avoid the bolt from moving if there isn't a paintball completely in the path of the bolt one of these devices is a break beam laser sensor much like your garage door safety sensor. it shoots a laser beam out and if it reaches the other side it notices there is no paintball ready and will not fire. these are called "eyes"

blow-back type markers use older technology and can be really reliable but at the same time there are more mechanical parts to break, luckily they are usually cheap and easy to fix. most paintball fields will use blow-back type markers as their rentals as they are easy to repair, maintain and do not shoot in a greater rate of speed which could scare or intimidate newer players.
basically they store pressurized air or co2 in a chamber until the trigger is pressed thus moving the sear and releasing the hammer and bolt. the bolt pushes the paintball into position in the barrel to create a seal and the hammer strikes the push valve of the pressurized air chamber releasing the air at once to shoot the paintball and send a small portion of that back to reset the hammer and bolt.

pumps work closely to the blow-back types but instead of using air pressure to reset the bolt and hammer you do it buy cycling it back your self and seating another paintball on the forward stroke.

equipment needed. mask(full face coverage including eyes nose and mouth), marker(aka paintball gun), propellant(co2 or high pressured air(hpa)), paintballs and loader. An appropriate place to play is a important part of the game these places would include: a properly insured and contained paintball field, a private wooded area with permission from the land owner, or your own privately owned wooded area far away from bystanders and houses.

paintball is a great safe sport if it is played responsibly.


i hope this helps.
here is some animations of the different paintball markers operation.
    http://www.zdspb.com/tech/misc/animations.html  

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Braden

Expertise

i can answer most scenario/woods ball related questions about markers, game tips, team help, pretty much any thing about scenario i will try to answer. don't ask me any thing about speed ball i have never played it and never will. don't ask me what field to go to because i dont know many fields away from my area.

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6 year scenario paintballer 1 year paintball shop tech, salesman 2 year scenario team captain

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college graduate

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