Painting & Wallpapering/Red Walls

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Question
A friend of mine painted her living room walls a true red color.  She primed twice and painted 5 coats.  The paint didn't cover at all and you could see all the roller strokes.  Even with the 5 coats, you can still see some lines and the color is uneven, like you can see where some coats are covered better than others.  Is there a certain step she could have taken to prevent all this or did she just get low quality paint?  She bought the primer from Canadian Tire and the paint is CIL Dulux.  The wall had been painted already, it is an older home.  She was originally told that the red she picked was such a true red that it wouldn't just go over white walls.  She is considering priming them over again with a white primer and starting over.  Shouldn't she get a tinted primer?
Any insight into all this would be much appreciated.
             Thanks in advance.......
                                        Val

Answer
Hello

I think I just answered your friends question! Heres what I said....

:  I painted my living room red it was from Wal-Mart it was called Rapture. I used a flat paint because everyone told me that I didn't want semi gloss cause it would be to shiny. I also used a primer underneath it I was also told to do that. After 7 yes I said seven coats of paint you can still see the marks from the primer under the paint. Every single mark. I have seen on trading spaces when they paint a red color they never prime. The paint I used was called CIL Dulux, thats supposed to be a good paint. Do you have any sugestions on what I could do to fix the problem. Paint rollers ect. I live in Canada I don't know if that matters or not. Thanks for the help Julie
Answer:  Hello

Well the first thing to know about paints is that RED is the most transparent. Priming is always recommended, but it this case your trying to cover a bright white primer with a transparent paint, and obviously you know the problem with that. Better to have your primer tinted before painting, and yes you can add some red to the primer making it pink which a little better than white but not much. The best primer color for red is GRAY believe it or not. Gray will allow the red to cover in about 1/2 the coats and also give it that deep rich look. Now another problem could be your paint. Unfortunatly Im not familiar with your brand, but the biggest difference between a cheap gallon of paint and a good one is HIDING!! There is a pigment called titanium dioxide and that pigment is very expensive so your cheaper paints leave that out, a good paints adds as much as it can but it costs more. I know here in America WalMarts paint dont have the best reputation, but they could be different there. If the paint was less that $15 american then that also could be part of the problem. If you think the color is almost covered, your best off to let dry for a week or so and give it a coat or 2 as it will eventually cover, however if it looks like its a way off yet, you may be better off to again let all these coats of paint dry then reprime with that gray primer, and give it a try (maybe with a better brand of paint...trust me a $25 gallon of paint will be very noticable!) and see it helps.
Good luck! Let me know how you do or if I can be of any more help to you
with this.

Michael Bruns
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Michael Bruns

Expertise

I can answer all questions related to interior and exterior painting, priming and preperation, as well as interior staining. Also exterior stains and deck staining, including preperation and product selection. Not very knowlegable with the actual wallpaper hanging process, but I am familiar with wall prep and wallpaper adhesives.

Experience

I own/manage a large True Value hardware store and have a large "TrueValue Paint Shop" inside our store. Also a certified Woodsman stain expert as well as a certified Cabot stain dealer.

Education/Credentials
I have attended numerous True Value paint seminars, which are held every year to keep us up to date on new products and procedures. Recently became a certified Woodsman stain woodcare expert, which included training on all exterior woodcare. We are also a certified Cabot stain dealer, which also included education on the products for our staff to be able to sell Cabot.

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