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Parrots/Bird cage for Jenday conure

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Question
I am getting a Jenday conure in April.  I have a western cedar birdcage my husband made several years ago.  I've had finches in it my last bird was a black masked love bird for 11 years.  I've read and heard that cedar is very toxic!  Are they just referring to ceder chips?  How did my love bird last so long if so?
Question?   Will this bird cage be safe for my bird?
Also the wiring is 1/4 wire mesh

Answer
--- It's true that cedar is not recommended for birds.  Not as substrate (chips or saw dust), not as perches and not as cage material.

It's the natural oils in cedar that WE like so much that is toxic.  Not just to birds either.

Your previous birds were just plain lucky and probably didn't gnaw at the wood.  Chances are that the outer layers of the wood has dried out over the years, as happens with cedar.   To bring cedar 'back to life', as in cedar chests, just a light sanding is suggested.

Which means that a bird can potentially renew the threat to their health just by rubbing their beaks on the wood and of course any chewing

It's really not worth taking that chance is it?

And with sensitive respiratory systems together with billions of years of hard wired experience at 'masking' (not giving a hint that they might be suffering) - you might be dooming a bird to a tortuous life in such a cage, despite it's intricate beauty.

 As for the wire mesh:  test it by holding any refrigerator magnet up to it.  If there's any magnetic pull whatsoever, even that is highly toxic in being a heavy metal.  

Powder coating is done on all metal cages that are not stainless steel and it's urged to have them re finished if any part of them shows chipping or wearing down to the metal under the coating.  

 It's obvious you genuinely care about your birds - so why take any chances?


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Rev. Dr. S.August Abbott

Expertise

Certified Avian Specialist; Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council member; Own animal rescue org; National Wildlife habitat #66378; bird care, nutrition & behavior consultant; International Assoc. of Animal Behavior Consultants Associate; National Wildlife Federation Leaders Club member; published bird care, info and behavior articles and guides. Ongoing education in exotic bird behavior and nutrition I can answer behavioral, nutritional, environmental, characteristic/personality questions as well as general health and health care. No animal emergency can ever be addressed on the internet. We cannot see your animal, perform an examination, provide necessary care or medication. Please value your companion for the priceless, living creature they are; not for what you might have paid for them.

Experience

Certified Avian Specialist. For more than 30 years I've worked with veterinarians, protective facilities, nature centers, preserves and on my own in providing care and education with regard to multiple animal species, including raptors (hawks, kestrals, owls, etc) and marsupials. In recent years I've focused on parrots, usually rescued from abusive or less than ideal situations and helping educate owners as to proper care. Expert in behavior studies and modification of problem behavior.

Organizations
4AnimalCare is the organization I run as an animal ministry; World Wildlife Association, Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, National Wildlife Federation Leaders Club and more

Publications
Bird Talk Magazine articles about rescued and problem macaws.

Education/Credentials
Doctorate, Ordained Minister

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