Pediatric Dentistry/cavity

Advertisement


Question
My son is 15 years old, it has been a week since i took him to the dentist, and the x-ray showed that he had a cavity inside tooth number 18 and 19. Number 19 already has a feeling on it, but the cavity is under the feeling. Number 18 is a new cavity , its  not noticable on the surface, but it is noticable on the x-ray . I dont know how thats possible. Can you please give me an explanation. I aprreciate your help.

Answer
Dear Evelyn;

Cavities are detected two ways by dentists. One way is visually checking and using an explorer which has a point to detect tooth decay. The other way is with X-rays.  X-rays will show if tooth decay exists between teeth where we can't visually check.

It sounds like your son has tooth decay between teeth #18 and #19 on his Xray picture.

Your dentist may better explain it to you by actually showing you the decay on the Xray.

Sincerely,

Dr. Glen

Pediatric Dentistry

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Glen Ehrenman D.D.S.

Expertise

I can answer any question in the field of pediatric dentistry which may include questions regarding interceptive orthodontics.

Experience

I have been in private practice for 26 years in Westbury, NY. My practice treats patients from infancy through their late adolescence.

Organizations
American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Nassau County Dental Society American Dental Association New York State Dental Association

Education/Credentials
SUNY at Stony Brook, School of Dental Medicine 1981-1985 Eastman Dental Center, Rochester, NY, Pediatric Dentistry 1985-1987

Awards and Honors
Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry Clinical Asst. Professor-SUNY at Stony Brook, School of Dental Medicine-Dept of Children's Dentistry Attending DDS-SUNY Stony Brook University Hospital Attending DDS-North Shore University Hospital at Syosset Attending DDS-Winthrop University Hospital

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.