Photography/Query re 4K

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Question
Hallo,

I have a few questions. First let me explain:-

I am in future months going up various rivers and mountains and lakes and need a camera for still photos and a videocamera for videos. They both need to be extremely tough and water-proof to a number of metres, therefore. I have decided on 2 products, the olympus tg4(camera for photos)  and the olympus tg tracker(videocamera):-
http://www.uwphotographyguide.com/olympus-tough-tg4-camera-review

http://www.dpreview.com/news/1160713055/olympus-tg-tracker-keeps-up-with-your-ou

Now, I am aware that the tg4 camera can make videos as well but it seems it cannot create "Ultra HD 4K" videos or photos. Only the TG Tracker can do so. Now, my PC does not have a 4K monitor just an LED monitor, so, presumably, I cannot view the 4K photos/4K videos on my own PC. However, that is not what I intend to do. I learnt from various youtube-videomakers that they preferred to film in 4K and then convert the 4K footage to 1080-standard images/videos, as this apparently meant that the resulting converted photos/films then looked more detailed and clearer to the eye. Is this something worth pursuing? or is the 4K-standard needless hype which no one currently really wants? Thanks! Geoff

Answer
Hello Geoffrey,

Sorry for the delay but your question accidentally went to my spam folder.

Your question is interesting because high def technology is expending rapidly in much more then just the consumer TV and video camera market. In the digital signage industry for example, LED dot matrix technology is now high def with the advancement of 1mm LED panels.

I see you've done your homework, which is the first step. Always research what you are buying and know what you're getting for the money. In order to view 4k content, your display will also need to be 4K. Depending on what content you will be converting, you will always lose some pixels. However, will this make much difference? I can say this. If the content is extraordinary, I would keep the native resolution. It's like editing a photo from a RAW file and saving it as a low res image versus its native resolution. Can you tell the difference on a high quality monitor, yes. On a standard VGA monitor, not really. Sites like facebook resize images automatically and most people are okay with that. If it were me, I would invest with a small 4k TV that has an HDMI and/or USB port and watch the content in its native format. if that's not an option, you have no choice but to reduce the quality to fit your display, which completely defeats the purpose.

Hope this makes sense.

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Ken

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I can answer questions as an expert for individual and model photography, portfolio development and networking. I can address your questions about location and/or studio photography, equipment selection, lighting, finding a professional photographer, difference between a professional photographer, amateur photographer and "Guy with Camera, what you should or shouldn't expect to pay for a professional photographer, pros and cons of nude photography, photo editing and more ...

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I'm a published and agency recommended professional freelance photographer from Southern California. I shoot for the specific photographic requirements of private individuals, models, actors, entertainers, designers, PR & talent firms, Red Carpet, Corporate and special events. I have over 10 years specializing in fashion, lifestyle, portraiture, editorial, headshots, swimwear, glamour, boudoir, lingerie, artistic, nude, erotic and theme specific photography. I'm also experienced with photo enhancement and retouch and I utilize professional photographic equipment from Canon. My software proficiency includes Photoshop CS6, Lightroom and Portrait Professional.

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I have studied photography at the Los Angeles School of Photography. I host educational seminars for amateur photographers twice a year in the LA area.

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