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Question
I have been doing some research about muon-catalysed fusion. It seems like getting a source of muon is what required for this method of fusion to be practical? So, can we use the muon from the cosmic to catalyst nuclear fusion. Since for every square meter on earth, 10000 muon will reach the earth's surface per minute, can we use that for fusion? This information comes from wikipedia.

Answer
That's per square meter per minute.  Yes, I have a student currently working on that actual issue by seeing if a giant Van de Graaf generator (random student project) can attract the negative muons that catalyze room-temperature fusion.  It's been done before, I head, but with muons created at a particle accelerator.  But that's not enough fusion events to create power, so for now it remains in the realm of science fiction.  :)

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Dr. Stephen O. Nelson

Expertise

I can answer most basic physics questions, physics questions about science fiction and everyday observations of physics, etc. I'm also usually good for science fair advice (I'm the regional science fair director). I do not answer homework problems. I will occasionally point out where a homework solution went wrong, though. I'm usually good at explaining odd observations that seem counterintuitive, energy science, nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and alternative theories of physics are my specialties.

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I was a physics professor at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, research in nuclear technology and nuclear astrophysics. My travelling science show saw over 20,000 students of all ages. I taught physics, nuclear chemistry, radiation safety, vacuum technology, and answer tons of questions as I tour schools encouraging students to consider careers in science. I moved on to a non-academic job with more research just recently.

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Ph. D. from Duke University in physics, research in nuclear astrophysics reactions, gamma-ray astronomy technology, and advanced nuclear reactors.

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