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QUESTION: Dear Expert

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country‎
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity

Some Countries supply the Alternating current (AC) Electric Power supply with Input Voltage rating as 230 V, 50 Hz and some Countries supply Alternating current (AC) Electric Power supply with Input Voltage rating as 110 V, 60 Hz.

So similarly various Electrical appliances and devices viz Microwave Ovens, Geysers, Electric Iron, freeze, Television set, Fans etc are designed to work with this Input Electric power.

Do you feel people residing in those countries which supply the 110 V, 60 Hz Input Power supply will have electricity Meter rating i.e. Electricity Bill less (i.e. Power consumption - Watts) as compared to those people residing in countries which supply the 230 V, 50 Hz Input Power supply ?.

Electricity Bill - Meter reading will be less for consumers staying in those countries which supply 110 V, 60 Hz than for those consumers staying in those countries which supply 230 V, 50 Hz electric supply ?.

Does the Input Electric Power variant will make a difference in Output power consumption and subsequently in Electricity Meter reading ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

ANSWER: > Do you feel people residing in those countries which supply the 110 V, 60 Hz
> Input Power supply will have electricity Meter rating i.e. Electricity Bill less ?

No.
Remember the unit that the electrical supply company bills its customers for: kilowatt-hours. This is a unit of ENERGY. A kilowatt is one-thousand joules of energy per second, and an hour is 3600 seconds -- thus a kilowatt hour is 3.6_x_10^6 joules of energy. In other words, the electrical supply company doesn't charge for volts, amps, or even kilowatts -- it charges for ENERGY.

For just about any task that electricity might do (light the bulbs, heat the house, cook the food, run the vacuum cleaner), the amount of ENERGY required to do a task is the same no matter what voltage you start with. Using 220V or 110V to enter a home is a compromise between reducing power losses in distributing the power (higher voltage, lower loss) and preserving light bulbs (lower voltage, light bulbs last longer). The two sides of the Atlantic simply reached different compromises; the U.S. has a lower voltage because early light bulbs simply couldn't handle 200 V.

But whether your home uses 110 V or 220 V, the difference in how much ENERGY you need to accomplish a task -- and the amount you will be billed for doing each of these tasks -- is negligible.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear Expert

Thank you.

Do you still feel for the same model in different countries with different input voltages of 230 V AC, 50 Hz and 110 V AC, 60 Hz for the electrical equipment used, will the electronic meter bill (Units consumed) for 110 V AC will be less as compared to 230 V AC, 50 Hz ?.

There are pros and cons of using 230 V AC, 50 Hz v/s 110 V AC, 60 Hz
adopted as the Power supply standards by different countries ?.

Isn't it ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
First of all, sorry about the delay in response -- I honestly thought I had already answered this question before today.

> will the electronic meter bill (Units consumed) for 110 V AC
> will be less as compared to 230 V AC, 50 Hz?

No, because there is less resistive loss for AC power when the voltage goes up. This is why the electricity carried for kilometers by electric transmission towers lines uses voltages of over 250 kilovolts.  This article
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_distribution#Variations
discusses some basic differences in the two systems.

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