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candiver wrote at 2009-10-10 21:09:06
Your answer is not accurate in true physics.

If the strength of one cord is X, and you add a second cord along side, the strength is 2X--no quarrel there, however if you braid the two together, the strength excedes 2X, and if you add the third cord, again braiding it with the others, your strength excedes 3X, which is why the "threefold cord" illustration is so apt.

Try this for yourself...you will be amazed!


Vita wrote at 2009-11-05 15:25:01
Tensile strength(N/mē)needed to broke the cord is dependent on the square section of the cord, not on the diameter. The three cords would be(about) NINE times stronger than a single one.(when not considering other factors like material or twisting)


Vita wrote at 2009-11-05 15:35:36
The strength needed to broke the cord is dependent on the square section of the cord, not on the diameter. The threefold cord would be(about) NINE times stronger than a single one.(when not considering other factors like material or twisting)


blackvolt wrote at 2015-07-08 05:31:01
Actually your answer is not completely correct.  The cord referred to in this Bible passage is called "threefold" which in the original language implies braiding.  When you braid, the sideways motion of the braid causes the overall length to be shorter than just laying the 3 ropes side by side.  In turn the cross sectional area increases and the tensile strength IS greater (potentially significantly) than just the 3 laying side by side.


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Karl Kuhn

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I can help with questions about general physics and can suggest demonstrations to physics teachers. I won`t be able to help with quantum mechanics or solid state physics. I will not answer homework problems, so please don`t ask. (You can only learn by working through these problems yourself. Don`t cheat!) I pride myself on being able to explain things on a beginner`s level.

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I taught general physics and astronomy at Eastern Kentucky University for 37 years
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Kentucky Physics Teacher of the Year, approximately 1990.

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