Piano, Organ, and Keyboard/Kimball M300 Diagnosis Question

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I writing about my Kimball Sensation M300... when it's turned on and any key is pressed, the organ makes a constant sound (of what looks to be the tone of the rightmost key on the lower keyboard)... with the pedal pushed down, the sound volume increases, but when the pedal goes all the back up, the sound takes awhile before it stops (versus it's stopping immediately when it was working fine years ago).  Also there's an intermittent electronic "scratching-type" noise that occurs simultaneously.  When it was first turned on tonight, I was able to get a few different notes to play... but then after a few minutes, none of the keys played any notes... just the high-pitched sound of the rightmost key and the scratching noise remained. The organ has not been played in years, and I'm now wanting to resume my playing... but unfortunately it appears the years of sitting idle have taken their toll (dust?  contact for the keys are oxidized? other possible reasons?)... I'm hoping you may be able to help point me to where I can begin diagnosing the root cause of my problem(s)... no repairman is familiar with Kimball's in my area (Southern NY), so I'm on my own... anything you can provide in the way of guidance on where I might start would be GREATLY appreciated... thx!  Roland

Answer
Hello Roland!  The most important clue in your description is the fact the organ has sat unused for years.  I see this problem a lot.  The place to start would be the power supply.  This is the heart of any electronic device.  If the power supply's output voltages are not correct nothing will work properly as you have described.

The most vulnerable component in the power supply would be the large electrolytic capacitors.  Their shelf life is affected by regular use vs non use.  If they sit uncharged for long periods of time, they are likely to fail and can either open or behave more like a resistor.  This can be very hard on the rest of the circuitry should either happen and can lead to extended damage to other components.  

Since your instrument was built in 1979, the likelihood of having power supply problems is quite high, so this is where I would start. Once all problems with the power supply have been corrected, the rest of the organ's circuitry can then be evaluated.  

I wish you success!  

Piano, Organ, and Keyboard

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Thomas Britanyak

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics. If you need a piano's date of manufacture, please go to http://www.pianoexchange.com/howold.htm or http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/pianoage.html I am happy to answer musical or technical questions, however, I CANNOT offer appraisals on pianos or organs. Please do not ask what an instrument is worth. For this service please contact an experienced local appraiser or try the following links: https://mmm1100.verio-web.com/blueb1/appraisal.html or http://www.57piano.com/questions.htm

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics.

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics.

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