Piano, Organ, and Keyboard/broken models for parts

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QUESTION: I have a Wurlitzer model 575 that was my mother' dream come true months before she died 1980. It was not cared for well before I finally acquired it. My dream was to fix and donate. But a recent post you made agreed with 3 other local people who told me same. My heart breaks to just pay for trash pick up. Is there no techs out there wanting for parts?

ANSWER: Hello Patricia!  If the organ has not been well cared for and doesn't work, few people would allow it to grace a spot in their living room.  However, that does not mean a trip to the dump.  Re-purposing has become a favorite pastime for many people who are always looking for things to re-purpose.  I suggest placing the instrument under "free stuff" on a website such as craigslist.com.  The instrument could be gone in a matter of hours. You do not mention what the problem with the organ is.  You never know, it could be a fairly simple fix for someone.  

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QUESTION: The organ played a few keystrokes and made a pop. I thought maybe it was a fuse but I didn't want to tear into it if there was anything to cause a shock. No one has taken time to look or test anything but the people told me over phone it could be costly for parts and still not fix it. So do you think it could be as simple as a fuse somewhere? If not, I guess I've got a repurpose idea myself.  Thank you for your thoughts.

Answer
If you want to check fuses safely, simply unplug the organ. Fuses are cheap and easy to replace.  However, if you replace a fuse and it blows again, then a short is present and the source of the short will need to be found.  Common causes are electrolytic filter capacitors, the rectifier &/or the power transformer, all of which are in the power supply.  Because this organ is a spinet instrument, its value is likely less than what it would cost to fix it.  So, it's probably not worth a repair bill...unless you want it fixed because of sentimental reasons or you plan to actually use it.  Since that seems not to be the case, I suggest placing it in the hands of someone who will.  And, if that doesn't work out, you can either re-purpose it or take it to a recycling center.  

Piano, Organ, and Keyboard

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Thomas Britanyak

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics. If you need a piano's date of manufacture, please go to http://www.pianoexchange.com/howold.htm or http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/pianoage.html I am happy to answer musical or technical questions, however, I CANNOT offer appraisals on pianos or organs. Please do not ask what an instrument is worth. For this service please contact an experienced local appraiser or try the following links: https://mmm1100.verio-web.com/blueb1/appraisal.html or http://www.57piano.com/questions.htm

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics.

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I am a full time organ/piano technician who has been actively involved with the design, building, repair, maintenance and installation of organs and pianos for 35 years. I began as a keyboard instrument apprentice and hold degrees in music and electronics.

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