Portuguese Language/Programme

Advertisement


Question
Dear Filipa,

I recently watched a programme about Portugal which included information on the language, and I'd be very grateful if you could clear up a few points for me, please:

1. After booking a family into his hotel, the clerk said something like “Boa Estadia”, meaning “Have a good stay”, but what is the precise correct form?

2. There's a beach near Lisbon called something like “A costa de Caparina” or something like that, isn't there?

3. The greatest poet of the twentieth century - Fernand Pessoa?

4. A kind of celebration in Lisbon with costumes - As massas de Lisboa?

Best wishes,

Simon

PS If this is too many questions for one time, please accept my apologies, feel free just to answer one or two and I can send the rest separately.

Answer
Dear Simon,

"Boa estadia", or "Tenham uma boa estadia" are both fine. They're rather formal, though, so if you want to sound a bit more casual you can say "Gozem a vossa estadia" ("Enjoy your stay").
Now, the beach you mentioned isn't called "Costa da Caparina", but "Costa da Caparica". We got it from a Brazilian beach in Rio de Janeiro I think...
And yes, Fernando Pessoa was, without doubt, our greatest poet in the twentieth century. I recommend "Mensagem" and "Ortónimo" for a bit of enjoyable reading. "Mensagem" contains 44 poems about Portugal in the Age of Discovery, and also circles around the mysterious death of our king, D. Sebastian, and how the Nation fell into ruin after it.
As for your last question, I don't think I ever heard about that, but I'll look it up and get back to you as soon as I have information.

Hope I was of help!

-Filipa

Portuguese Language

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Filipa Cruz Simões

Expertise

I can help anyone who's interested to learn Portuguese, and I can also translate from English and Spanish to Portuguese, and vice-versa.

Experience

I'm a native speaker of the language.

Education/Credentials
In High School.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.