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Psychiatry & Psychology--General/Follow-up questions to abusive parent with possible Disassociative Identity Disorder

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I apologize, I think my several questions were not very well defined, and I talked too much about my own trauma.  My questions are pretty much about disassociative identity order and how that plays into people who are abusers.  My apologies, I would post as follow-up questions, but I accidentally typed an incorrect email address in the form..:

-Is the type of abuse my mother inflicted on us common in people who have diassociative identity disorder? Or is it likely to be something else? (I know you've never met her and can't diagnose her - just am trying to figure out if it is really a possibility?).  
-If it is actually likely or possible, is it possible for someone who has an abusive identity, to prevent their "identity" or "states" from doing or acting in a certain way? Is it possible for her to prevent some of her "states" from taking over or committing certain actions, without treatment?  I am wondering if this is possible, because the physical abuse stopped when I refused to forgive her and told her how much she has damaged me?
-If someone with Disassociative Identity Disorder DOES have an abuser or abuser(s) state of identity, is there anything the victims and/or onlookers can do to stop the abuser states from abusing, in any way? For example, if I called her by her abusive father's name when she was like that, would that help her "snap out of it"?
-If my mother does indeed have disassociative identity order, or disassociative states, is it true she might not truly remember and have differences of opinion from other states? (For some reason I am struggling with if she REALLY can't remember and REALLY does blame me vs. doesn't sometimes, and knowing what the possibilities might be would help give me a little clarity.  It may seem odd, but I can handle the thought that she might just be a horrible manipulative person better than the thought that she just can't control herself in some way, and will never realize the horrible things she's done).
-If someone has Disassociative Personality Disorder, IF they agreed to and got treatment, would that treatment likely result in the abusive personalities or states stopping?
-Would they have to remember all of the horrible things they did to stop the abusive behavior?
-Would they have to remember all of the horrible things they saw as a child, or all of the things that were done to them as a child, to get those abusive personalities or states to stop begin abusive?

Thanks. Public place boundaries are a good suggestion if complete ceasing of contact is impossible.  Just dealing with my opinions of this all and struggling with my opinions about her.

Answer
Is the type of abuse my mother inflicted on us common in people who have diassociative identity disorder? Yes.
Or is it likely to be something else? No
-If it is actually likely or possible, is it possible for someone who has an abusive identity, to prevent their "identity" or "states" from doing or acting in a certain way? Yes
Is it possible for her to prevent some of her "states" from taking over or committing certain actions, without treatment? Yes

-If someone with Disassociative Identity Disorder DOES have an abuser or abuser(s) state of identity, is there anything the victims and/or onlookers can do to stop the abuser states from abusing, in any way? Get the person to therapy.


-If my mother does indeed have disassociative identity order, or disassociative states, is it true she might not truly remember and have differences of opinion from other states? Yes


-If someone has Disassociative Personality Disorder, IF they agreed to and got treatment, would that treatment likely result in the abusive personalities or states stopping? yes

-Would they have to remember all of the horrible things they did to stop the abusive behavior? No

-Would they have to remember all of the horrible things they saw as a child, or all of the things that were done to them as a child, to get those abusive personalities or states to stop begin abusive? No

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Daniel S. Harrop, M.D.

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Dr. Daniel S. Harrop received his B.A. and his M.D., both from Brown, and his M.B.A. from the Edinburgh Business School, Scotland. Board-certified in adult and geriatric psychiatry, he is a past president of the R.I. Psychiatric Society and a member of the Committee on Medical Quality of the American Psychiatric Association and the Committee on Continuing Medical Education of the R.I Medical Society. He serves as a consultant to four of the top five major medical management companies, including OptumHealth/United Healthcare, Magellan Behavioral Health Services, ValueOptions and APS Healthcare, and maintains a private practice in Providence, R.I. He also serves as chief psychiatric consultant on the Medical Advisory Board at the R.I. Workers Compensation Court. He was formerly on the faculty at the medical schools at both Brown University and Harvard University.

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