You are here:

Reptiles/tegu constipated

Advertisement


Question
Good day

I was reading your post to Matt about his Tegu, from your answers you sound like you definitely know what your talking about. If I can throw a couple questions your way it would be greatly appreciated.
First, Our tegus are both male one is 3foot and the other is about 3 foot 4 inches. The larger is eating fine and having regular movements, but the smaller one is only eating a few grapes at a time and is straining (hard) when trying to have a movement, with only a few drops to show for his efforts. He is drinking water, but not alot. The vivarium is 8 foot by 2 foot and 2 foot high with soil bottom, we have it set up with a hot and cool side, with the hot temp usually about 89 to 92.
You had mentioned a parasites what would I look for to confirm this. The vet here has never dealt witha tegu before and charges 90 dollars just for an appointment.

Secondly, I was wondering about how much calcium and vitamin per week would be proper for a tegu of this size. We have been told several different amounts and was hoping to be set straight as I do not want to burn out the tegus by giving them to much.

Again, Thanks for your time
Dave

Answer
Hello Dave,

Are they housed separately or with a divider in the tank?  
Please send pictures!  They both sound beautiful.  
How long have you had them both, or is the smaller one the newest addition you have?
Which type of tegus are they, the Black & White or the Columbian?
What type & brand of UVB light are you using, a fluorescent tube bulb or a compact/coil light?  What are the temperatures in the tank now & do you use a digital probe or temp tun to measure the temperatures with?  Is the basking light a bright white light also?  
The basking temperatures can be in a range of 95-100 with a cooler end of around 78-82 or so.  

There could be a problem with worms or parasites especially if there is any stress associated with either one of them.  If the stool is really runny & or smelly then parasites or worms could be the culprit.  If it is affecting the appetite & desire to bask, then the levels could be too high.  You could consider deworming just to see if that would help as deworming is normally safe to do as long as they are dosed properly.  

The calcium for the smaller one should be 5 times per week, with vitamins one or two times per week.  The adult can get by with calcium 3 times per week most of the time, with vitamins being once a week.  As long as they have a good diet, the vitamins are not as important, but calcium in the youngsters can't be overlooked during the growing years especially.  
What foods are you feeding for protein or bugs, etc?


Tracie

Reptiles

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Tracie Kretzschmar

Expertise

I can answer questions pertaining to health, UVB specifics, overall husbandry care & supplementation, analysis of blood test results, and behavioral problems & handling. I can answer questions pertaining to bearded dragons, leopard geckos, iguanas, uromastyx & ball pythons. I can answer adeno virus related questions in bearded dragons, & then specifically about the testing methods as well. I am beginning an Pogona Adeno Testing Society in 2008 which will help to begin to start some standardization within the bearded dragon colonies of the breeders who choose to test.

Experience

I have been working with bearded dragons for over 5 years now, as well as leopard geckos, too. I am currently doing rescues, as well. I hope to be able to educate people prior to them purchasing an exotic pet in order to avoid any health crisis with them.

Education/Credentials
I have a master's degree in sports medicine & physiology, & 1 year of vet tech schooling, & am currently working on a reptile certification through the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.