Russian Language/, !

Advertisement


Question
Dear Ivan

I do hope all is well with you and yours.

A Russian conversation in my textbook ends like this:
Ну, всё! До ско́рого.

The second part, До ско́рого, must mean ‘see you soon’ – is that right, please?

But what about Ну, всё!? How can we translate it and when is it used, please?

Best wishes, and many thanks,

Simon

Answer
Dear Simon,

'Ну, всё' is identical to the English 'well then' and literally translates 'well [that's] all'.

'До ско́рого' is not really common any more but people still use it. Mostly, in Russia, I guess. As an informal good-bye amongst educated folks. Literally, it reads 'until soon' and is a shorter version of something you will probably never hear 'до скорого свидания' where the last word means 'visitation' or, literally, 'seeing each other'. This full version is something you find in books written in Soviet times or earlier.

Hope that answers your questions. Good luck on your study of our crazy language :)

Regards,
Ivan

Russian Language

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Ivan Boryagin

Expertise

Any intelligent questions are welcome.

Experience

I am a linguist with nearly 20 year experience as translator.

Education/Credentials
Honours in Literature

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.