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Question
Hi Bruce,
I hope to visit Scotland this summer. I am trying to decide if I can drive or will need to rely on trains or buses. I have a problem with heights and bridges. Is it possible to visit the Highlands and the major points of interest without having to deal with bridges?
If not, could you direct me to the best place for bus and train information.
Thank you.
Rosemary

Answer
Hi Rosemary,

Heights isn't really a problem as long as you don't mind being at the bottom and looking up, eg in Glencoe? I'm taking the line that you do not like crossing bridges, rather than you do not like driving under bridges (due to the restricted height for your vehicle or similar)? It also depends on how restricted you are?

I'm not aware of a route planner or guide which would take that into consideration, but it would be possible to avoid *most* bridges, eg to go from Edinburgh to Stirling, I would normally recommend driving over the Forth Road Bridge, so that you get to see the Forth Bridge, but you can easily drive there without crossing the River Forth.

However, I think it would be pretty difficult to avoid *all* bridges, eg a bridge over a railway or over an old minor road (although you would rarely be able to see anything other than low walls), and you cannot get to some, if not a lot of places, eg Montrose, Perth, Aberdeen, without crossing a bridge to get into it. You could avoid the main rivers, but not all.

That would also apply to trains and buses, eg, if you take the train, the east coast line, for example, would include the Forth Bridge (which, again, I would normally recommend) and also bridges/viaducts at Montrose, Dundee and Aberdeen.

You could have a look at theaa.com, use the route planner, zoom in and see what you think?

Good luck.

Scotland

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Bruce Fyfe

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General questions on Scotland and things Scottish. No recomendations for particular services such as hotels, restaurants, routes etc. No genealogy questions.

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A Scot (and, by the looks of it, the only such expert on this forum).

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