Strength Training/push ups

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Question
QUESTION: Sir can my belly(not chest,legs or knees) touch the floor after coming downwhile performing a push

ANSWER: Hey Abid and thank you for your question.

For performing a push up, your body should be in a straight line as you descend and ascend. If your belly is sticking, you are most likely letting your hips sag and drop, which I would not advise. Try to keep everything in a straight line as you go down and up.


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Sir actually i have increased weight causing my belly to be really fat therefore my belly touches the floor before my chest  or any other part and i rise myself before any other part than belly touches the floor

Answer
Hey Abid. Try to go as low as you can go for the push up. Also try to do a cardiovascular activity such as jogging/biking/swimming several (3-4) times a week to burn excess weight so your belly will shrink.

If you find your stomach is causing you trouble for push ups, get a dumbbell in each hand and do a lying down dumbbell bench press and aim for 8-12 repetitions of 1-2 sets starting. Then the next week increase the weight slightly or do an extra set.

Let me know if this is working and email me back for a follow up. Thanks Abid!

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Daniel

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I can answer Strength training questions, Fitness, sports specific training, injury rehabilitation and lifestyle behavior changes.

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I train primarily athletes and regular people who need to get back in a fitness routine.

Organizations
NSCA; The National Strength and Conditioning Association ACSM; The American College of Sports Medicine CSEP; The Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology NASM; The National Academy of Sports Medicine

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You can find more of my material at www.fit2assist.com for further information on how to start building yourself, improve your body and live better.

Education/Credentials
I am an Exercise Scientist & Strength and Conditioning coach with 6 specializations/credentials, - Strength Conditioning Specialist with the National Strength and Conditioning Association, primarily dealing with athletic performance training. - Corrective Exercise specialist (CES) and Sports Performance Coach (PES) with the National Academy of Sports Medicine. - An Health fitness Specialist with the American College Of Sports Medicine - An Exercise Physiologist with CSEP. -TRX Group Qualified instructor.

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