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Trusts & Estates Law/Garn St Germain occupancy

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Question
I am inheriting my brother's home. Garn St. Germain Act prohibts from due on sale clause. Now I read in some posts that it has to be owner occupied. However, when reading this act, it just says cannot call loan on a property transfer b/c of relative inheriting. Where does this Act state I have to occupy the inherited home?

Answer
Cheryl you should always ask attorney and not rely these posts.  That said, I believe it is rubbish.  The law does not say you have to live there.   By the way how would they find out about the transfer anyway?  I have personally never seen it enforced and most of my attorney friends claim the same.  They are not checking the courthouse every day to see if any of their thousands of liens have been transferred (I mean the underlying property against which the lien exists).  

Assuming you want to be very conservative Here is what it says are the ONLY conditions upon which a lender may enforce the due on sale clause -


U.S. Code › Title 12 › Chapter 13 › § 1701j–3
12 U.S. Code § 1701j–3 - Preemption of due-on-sale prohibitions

Current through Pub. L. 113-75, except 113-66. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.)

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(a) Definitions
For the purpose of this section—
(1) the term “due-on-sale clause” means a contract provision which authorizes a lender, at its option, to declare due and payable sums secured by the lender’s security instrument if all or any part of the property, or an interest therein, securing the real property loan is sold or transferred without the lender’s prior written consent;
(2) the term “lender” means a person or government agency making a real property loan or any assignee or transferee, in whole or in part, of such a person or agency;
(3) the term “real property loan” means a loan, mortgage, advance, or credit sale secured by a lien on real property, the stock allocated to a dwelling unit in a cooperative housing corporation, or a residential manufactured home, whether real or personal property; and
(4) the term “residential manufactured home” means a manufactured home as defined in section 5402 (6) of title 42 which is used as a residence; and
(5) the term “State” means any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.
(b) Loan contract and terms governing execution or enforcement of due-on-sale options and rights and remedies of lenders and borrowers; assumptions of loan rates
(1) Notwithstanding any provision of the constitution or laws (including the judicial decisions) of any State to the contrary, a lender may, subject to subsection (c) of this section, enter into or enforce a contract containing a due-on-sale clause with respect to a real property loan.
(2) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (d) of this section, the exercise by the lender of its option pursuant to such a clause shall be exclusively governed by the terms of the loan contract, and all rights and remedies of the lender and the borrower shall be fixed and governed by the contract.
(3) In the exercise of its option under a due-on-sale clause, a lender is encouraged to permit an assumption of a real property loan at the existing contract rate or at a rate which is at or below the average between the contract and market rates, and nothing in this section shall be interpreted to prohibit any such assumption.
(c) State prohibitions applicable for prescribed period; subsection (b) provisions applicable upon expiration of such period; loans subject to State and Federal regulation or subsection (b) provisions when authorized by State laws or Federal regulations
(1) In the case of a contract involving a real property loan which was made or assumed, including a transfer of the liened property subject to the real property loan, during the period beginning on the date a State adopted a constitutional provision or statute prohibiting the exercise of due-on-sale clauses, or the date on which the highest court of such State has rendered a decision (or if the highest court has not so decided, the date on which the next highest appellate court has rendered a decision resulting in a final judgment if such decision applies State-wide) prohibiting such exercise, and ending on October 15, 1982, the provisions of subsection (b) of this section shall apply only in the case of a transfer which occurs on or after the expiration of 3 years after October 15, 1982, except that—
(A) a State, by a State law enacted by the State legislature prior to the close of such 3-year period, with respect to real property loans originated in the State by lenders other than national banks, Federal savings and loan associations, Federal savings banks, and Federal credit unions, may otherwise regulate such contracts, in which case subsection (b) of this section shall apply only if such State law so provides; and
(B) the Comptroller of the Currency with respect to real property loans originated by national banks or the National Credit Union Administration Board with respect to real property loans originated by Federal credit unions may, by regulation prescribed prior to the close of such period, otherwise regulate such contracts, in which case subsection (b) of this section shall apply only if such regulation so provides.
(2)
(A) For any contract to which subsection (b) of this section does not apply pursuant to this subsection, a lender may require any successor or transferee of the borrower to meet customary credit standards applied to loans secured by similar property, and the lender may declare the loan due and payable pursuant to the terms of the contract upon transfer to any successor or transferee of the borrower who fails to meet such customary credit standards.
(B) A lender may not exercise its option pursuant to a due-on-sale clause in the case of a transfer of a real property loan which is subject to this subsection where the transfer occurred prior to October 15, 1982.
(C) This subsection does not apply to a loan which was originated by a Federal savings and loan association or Federal savings bank.
(d) Exemption of specified transfers or dispositions
With respect to a real property loan secured by a lien on residential real property containing less than five dwelling units, including a lien on the stock allocated to a dwelling unit in a cooperative housing corporation, or on a residential manufactured home, a lender may not exercise its option pursuant to a due-on-sale clause upon—
(1) the creation of a lien or other encumbrance subordinate to the lender’s security instrument which does not relate to a transfer of rights of occupancy in the property;
(2) the creation of a purchase money security interest for household appliances;
(3) a transfer by devise, descent, or operation of law on the death of a joint tenant or tenant by the entirety;
(4) the granting of a leasehold interest of three years or less not containing an option to purchase;
(5) a transfer to a relative resulting from the death of a borrower;
(6) a transfer where the spouse or children of the borrower become an owner of the property;
(7) a transfer resulting from a decree of a dissolution of marriage, legal separation agreement, or from an incidental property settlement agreement, by which the spouse of the borrower becomes an owner of the property;
(8) a transfer into an inter vivos trust in which the borrower is and remains a beneficiary and which does not relate to a transfer of rights of occupancy in the property; or
(9) any other transfer or disposition described in regulations prescribed by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board.


My takeaway - don't worry about it.  Worry about something else!  Again only a licensed attorney can give you legal advice and I'm betting you can get your answer for free with on phone call to a real estate lawyer.  

Take care,

David Disraeli
www.financingalternatives.net

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