Urology/injury

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Question
QUESTION: Hello doctor, so about a 7 weeks ago I had an erection while sleeping then I accidentally rolled on it. Suddenly, I hear and feel a slight "popping" sensation near the base of my penis, but no pain at all. My erection soon goes away, and my flaccid penis felt a lot more hard like there was a tube running through it. My erections immediately afterward were much weaker and not as rigid. 7 weeks later, they have made a full recovery, going from wobbly and bending downward to very rigid and pointing above the horizontal.

The only problem is that this firmness remains when my penis is flaccid. I consulted a urologist about this two weeks after my injury and he told me that it was most likely a vein injury and it would heal on its own, but he didn't give me a time frame.

Do you think I injured a vein along with the suspensory ligament? Do these injuries usually happen together? How long do they take to recover? Should it have resolved already after almost 2 months?


If its not a vein, what is causing this firmness while flaccid?

ANSWER: Jim:

I can't determine what you may have injured, but typically these injuries involve the ligaments that hold the penis and they take months to heal.  Some scarring or stiffness may still remain and unfortunately there is no good therapy.  Some have tried using a daily Cialis which increases blood flow to the penis but there is very little information on any benefit.  Still, I would try it for whatever good it might do.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you doctor for the reply. I just have a quick follow-up question.

This stiffness sometimes causes me some very mild discomfort but the urologist told me its nothing to worry about. In your experiences, does this stiffness go away long after the person has recovered their erections fully? Does this symptom take a year or so?

Thanks again doctor, I appreciate it.

ANSWER: Jim:

Stiffness similar to what you describe typically disappears over time as mentioned earlier.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Sorry to bother you again doctor, but I had a couple more questions.

With these types of injuries, there is no damage to the corporal bodies correct? So there shouldn't be any future curvature with erections?

I am getting worried because my partial erections look different. Thanks doctor.

Answer
Jim:

Its impossible to determine if you may have injured or bruised the corporal bodies.  This type of injury is thought to contribute to Peyronie's disease and possible penile curvature in the future.  Unfortunately, there is no good way to know for sure or to predict whether or not there might be some late complications.  Worse, there really isn't anything you can do about it now except to avoid similar injuries going forward.

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Stephen W. Leslie, MD

Expertise

Questions concerning erectile dysfunction, kidney stones and prostate disorders including prostate cancer. I have a special interest in kidney stone disease prevention.

Experience

Full time practicing urologist with 30 years experience. Associate Professor of Surgery and Chief of Urology at Creighton University Medical Center. Editor in Chief of eMedicine Urology internet textbook. Author of only NIH approved book written for patients by a urologist on the subject of kidney stones "The Kidney Stones Handbook". Inventor of the "Parachute" and "Escape" kidney stone baskets and the "Calculus" stone prevention analysis computer program.

Organizations
American Urological Association, Ohio State Medical Association, Sexual Medicine Society

Publications
Men's Health, Journal of Urology, Urology, Healthwatch Magazine, Emergency Medicine Monthly, eMedicine, "The Kidney Stones Handbook", and numerous articles in various newspapers. He is also the editor of the Urology Board Review by McGraw-Hill used by urologists to study for their Board Certification Examinations.

Education/Credentials
Graduate of New York Medical College with residencies completed at Metropolitan Hospital New York, Albany Medical Center and University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Awards and Honors
Thirlby Award of the American Urological Association. Rated as one the country's Best Urologists by the Independent Consumer's Research Institute

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