You are here:

Urology/Deviated penis

Advertisement


Question
Doctor

I am a single male and is going to marry within weeks. I noticed that my erect penis deviates about an angle of 30. Is there any conservative way to correct this or should I undergo surgery?

Answer
John, the normal anatomy of the penis consists of 3 cylindrical bodies.  The paired corpora cavernosa (erectile bodies) are spongy vascular spaces and each is surrounded by a thick membrane termed the tunica albuginea.  The corpora cavernosa become engorged with arterial blood during sexual arousal, stretching the membrane that surrounds them (tunica albuginea).  Although there are also corporal veins that tend to drain blood away from the corpora, in normal erections the pressure in inside the erectile bodies increases because of limited "give" of the tunica albuginea.  Thus arterial inflow of blood exceeds venous outflow and erection occurs.  The third cylindrical body is the single corpus spongiosum which contains the urinary canal (urethra) and terminates in the glans penis.  The glans penis caps the distal end of the corpora cavernosa.  The corpus spongiosum also has an arterial and venous blood supply.  However, it is not surrounded by a limiting membrane (tunica albuginea) and, therefore, although it becomes somewhat engorged with erection, the degree that it contributes to overall tumescence is quite variable.  

Curvature of the penis to varying degrees occurs in about 50% of men.  It is often congenital (born with the condition) but can be acquired due to injury or a disorder called Peyronie's disease. Curvature can be due to one of the corpora being shorter than the other or to the deposition of scar tissue in part of the tunica albuginea which acts like a bow string and prevents this area from expanding.  I suggest that you see a urologist  so that a proper examination and diagnosis be made.  Generally, no treatment is necessary unless the curvature causes discomfort to you or your partner with sexual activity or if the curvature is so severe that you are unable to have conventional intercourse.   If necessary (and I again stress it is usually not necessary) the most common therapy is surgical correction which can either be done by slightly foreshortening the corpora on the side opposite the scarring (plication) or removing the scar tissue and placing a graft at that site.  The latter is not as reliable as it heals with a varying degree of scar that is difficult to estimate and may not correct the problem.  Generally, surgery is not done purely for cosmetic reasons.  Therefore, if you otherwise function well sexually, an understanding partner is the best therapy.  Good luck.

Urology

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Arthur Goldstein, M.D.

Expertise

Problems or questions related to the field of urology; ie urinary stone disease, urinary cancers (kidney, bladder, prostate, testis, etc.), urinary infections, etc. I no longer answer questions related to erection problems or male sexual dysfunction.

Experience

I am retired from the active practice of urology. My 34 years was totally in the clinical field and involved the entire gamut of genitourinary problems, with special interest in endourology.

Organizations
American Medical Association, American Urological Association, American College of Surgeons

Education/Credentials
College degree - BS Medical degree - MD Master of Science - MS

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.