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Vines/Suppernong problems

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Question
Suppernongs here are getting ripe.  Problem is I keep finding a substance on or hanging from the fruit which look like spit.  It is a foamy type substance.  Had someone say it was from crickets but some of these vines are overhead.  Thought maybe it was a snake but have not seen one.  Can you give me info on this.  thank you

Answer
Hello, Jan-
Not to worry. The "spit" you see on your Scuppernong is actually from an insect called a "spittlebug." These insects are often found on grapevines, pecan trees, shrubs of all kinds, and even turf grass. Underneath the foam, you would find the insect. Spittlebugs excrete this substance to protect itself from other insects and for insulation as it matures. The good news: this substance does not hurt plants or people. The next good rain should wash it away, but you can use your hose to do the job.

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Kathleen Franklin

Expertise

I can answer all kinds of questions about vines that thrive in most U.S. soils/climates, though I am more knowledgeable about Zones 4-8. I am a huge fan of vines (even the sort of "Look out, Martha, here it comes again" varieties), especially wisteria, climbing hydrangea, Carolina jessamine, and (invasive though it is) English Ivy. I grow them all, and would love to share what I've learned with you!

Experience

I am a certified, active Master Gardener in Maryland (Montgomery County) and have six+ years experience working at a local garden nursery. I've been gardening for more than 20 years and have done consulting work for many residential homeowners on all aspects of gardening and garden design.

Organizations
Maryland Master Gardeners Friends of Brookside Gardens Nature Conservancy

Publications
I have authored numerous nature and gardening-related articles for publications ranging from Audubon Naturalist News to Washington Gardener magazine.

Education/Credentials
I have taken courses in Integrated Pest Management, perennials, shrubs, and vines.

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