Weightlifting & Exercise/Bikes

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QUESTION: Well I got the bike I wanted and for the large part I like it. However the spring loaded seat is a bit unnerving, and when I was a kid the only bike I had was a one speeder and I don't know how to properly change gears. Do I slow down, stop, stop peddling only, or cycle backwards until something catches? Also how do I determine whether to use the front brakes or rear brakes? I have largely only used feet brakes on my old bike so am not quite sure the ideal use of the handle bar brakes?

ANSWER: Hi James,

You can always change the seatpost and get rid of the suspension saddle,

DO not slow down or brake to shift, simply shift as you are pedaling it should work better. slowing down or backpedaling can cause the chain to fly off

Use the brakes as needed either both brakes or the rear brakes. do not use the front brakes alone unless they are all you have. If you lock up the front brakes you could fly over the handlebars and take a header, no fun at all.

Hope this helps

Have a great day

Jerry

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: I was watching some videos on changing gears and in particular heard about cross chaining. Why are bikes built that there are gear configurations that do damage to the bike? Also why are there more than one sprocket? It seems like if you decrease the size of the cog you get more tork and less speed and visa versa with larger. But if you change the sprocket size you may neutralize the benefit of relative difference in gear size?

ANSWER: Hi James,

Bicycles are unique and often misunderstood marvels of technology. By decreasing the size of the cog on the rear of the bike while subsequently increasing the size of the cog on the front of the bike you actually tend to increase torgue which means the bike wheels turn faster with the same number of pedal turns. The system was developed through years of trial and error and has been proven over and over again to be effective.

There are several gear combinations that duplicate so a 27 speed bike which has 9 cogs on the rear and 3 on the front actually may only have 15 or 16 different gear ratios. but it does have 27 different gear combinations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derailleur_gears
This may help

Have a great day

Jerry

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: What would you say is the threshold for cross chaining? I have 3 sprockets on peddle and 8 in back. How should I shift? If 1 in peddle maybe 1-4 in rear, then shift peddle to two and reduce rear down to 1 or 2 to start, and only go 5-8 in rear when peddle is at 3? How do I change to avoid cross chaining all together? Any ideas bouncing around to put all reasonable options on one dial?

Answer
Hi James,

Sorry this took so long. There is no way to avoid cross chaining altogether unless you simply do not shift, put the chain in what is closest to a straight line from the front chainring to the rear cog then simply leave it there. Or simply buy a single speed bike or a 3 speed with something like a Nexus Hub.

Cross chaining can cause damage but rarely if ever does it cause problems for the casual rider.

For  a 3x8 like what you have it really isn't significant.

As far as shifting keep it simple, when riding on flats keep the front in the large chainring
When riding up hills shift larger cogs on the rear or the smaller cogs on the front to get the best feel.

Go  out ride your bike and have some fun.

Have a great day

Hope this helps


Jerry Goodwin  

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Jerry Goodwin

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I can answer questions related to any of the following areas alternative medicine, fitness, physical education, weight training, senior health, bicycling, personal trainers, personal training, medical technology, health and wellness, eating disorders, weight loss, Naturopathy, first aid, and bodybuilding. In fact I was listed as an expert in each of these categories at askme.com until they closed down

Experience

I have worked in health and or fitness related capacities for over 30 years. My main profession is that of a Medical Technologist, but I also have training as a Corpsman with the US Navy, a Field Medic with the Army National Guard,and am certified as A Personal Trainer, Medical Exer-therapist and Aerobics Instructor through the National Academy for Health and Fitness. My wife and I have operated BMG Services Fitness and Nutrition in Moultrie Georgia since 1995. I also have an Associates Degree in Computer Robotics. I am an avid bicycle rider, mostly road riding with the occasional mountain trail or off road "experience". My wife and I usually do a charity ride at least once per year to help those less fortunate. Degrees & Certifications: Certifications include Clinical Laboratory Scientist CLS/NCA. Clinical Laboratory Technologist CLT/HHS Personal Trainer, Aerobics Instructor, and Medical Exer-therapist NAHF. Advance Weight Training through NAHF. Accepted as AFTA Associate Awards include the Ohio State Award of Merit and Ohio Special Services Ribbon, Army Commendation Medal and 2 Army Achievement Medals CPR re-Certifcation 2007 Web page: http://www.bmgfitness.com http;//www.healthandfitnessebookclub.com

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