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Woodworking/Crown moulding on dormer

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RickO wrote at 2014-03-03 14:32:55
This was originally posted in 2006 however in the interest of helping others looking to solve the same problem,  here are some options.   1.  Run the crown directly in to your wall and finish at 135 degrees.  In other words, give up on trying to crown the 135 section.   1-A:   Run the crown Almost to the wall 3-4 inches and return it for a finished look.  1 and 1-A, restart the crown inside the dormer and return near the 135 degree.   Which I don't really like.    2.   Cut a soft piece at 135 and bring it out to the point where it meets the needed 90 degree for the crown.   I would give it a bit of a reveal for added interest so it doesn't look like a simple slab-o-wood bringing it out to your 90.    IMO:   I'd run it like 1,  right in to the wall.   Then forget the sides of the dormer and crown the top of the window side to side.    This will bring a bit more continuity to the overall room.     Your mileage may vary - all answer are good (and bad.)    Good luck.  


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Stuart Mawle

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Now been a carpenter & joiner for the past twenty years in the UK. I can give avice / help on carpentry & joinery, health & safety, woodworking machinery, power tools and suppliers.

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